Co-parenting is considered by most Americans to be the most positive way to manage parenting after a divorce. This is because the children will still receive equal attention from both parents, even though the parents may no longer cohabitate. While co-parenting has many pros, it can also be difficult for parents to manage, particularly if they have an acrimonious relationship outside of the co-parenting agreement. It is not unusual for there to be disagreements within the realm of co-parenting. According to Helpguide.org, the main thing to keep in mind while working through co-parenting disagreements is respect. 

Co-parenting is not easy, but it is important to remain flexible in both your schedule and your expectations. It is vital for both of you to know when certain major school or extra-curricular events are occurring so that there is the greatest chance of not having a schedule conflict. 

You also need to listen to the opinion of your ex-spouse seriously. You may think that their concerns are trivial, but remember that by court decree they are entitled to a certain amount of say in the upbringing of your children. Compromise is key where co-parenting is concerned. Remember that a good compromise often means that both parties walk away from the table not entirely satisfied. If you come into co-parenting expecting to “win” the arguments constantly, your situation will be full of strife. 

Try to take it easy and not fight on every little point. For instance, if you disagree on bedtime by a half-hour, that may be something for you to let go. Save the arguments for major issues like medical problems.